<back...The Making of a Legend by Rod Stewart  -  He always had encouraging words, especially when Id mess up on stage. Hed just say, "Oh youre young yet; itll all come to you". It wasnt dismissive. It was always said in a way that made me feel he believed what he was telling me. John taught me so much things that apply to my life and things that made me the human being I am today. He had tremendous stage presence. "You watch any great performer and they never stand at the microphone with their legs together." he said. "Have a manly stance. Be bold on stage bold as you would be playing soccer", which I was good at then.

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He taught me to project with my hands when Im singing. See me onstage today and youre seeing what John taught me. John was really looking out for me when we were on the road. My first time in a club outside of London, we played a club In Manchester (Kyles note where Eric Burdon lived and started). He said, "Dont worry just get up there and sing". I was nervous. A band mate gave me a pill an amphetamine called a black bomber. I got onstage and played one song for 20 minutes, the same verse over and over. John found out and reprimanded the guy, firing him for corrupting me. He was very fatherly, always looking out for my welfare. As our careers progressed, John continued playing in clubs, which hes still happily doing. He didnt write songs; hes never been ambitious that way. Although he made some albums that got radio play, he was never a huge recording star. But in the UK he did have a #1 hit with 'Let the Heartaches Begin'. Hes not particularly worried about financial gain or seeing himself in the papers. Hes comfortable as long as he can play his guitar. John may not be a legend in the proverbial sense, but hes a cult hero with his own following and the fans who flock to his performances. He leaves me phone messages with that accent of his: "Dear Roddy, how the hell are you?" Every time I pick up a guitar, I play the old folk song 'Mother Ain't Dead', which I learned with John in the mid 60s. We both love the Blues, and were tremendously in love with American Folk music. In fact next time Im touring & hes in the neighborhood, I think Ill ask him to come onstage and play 'Mother Ain't Dead', just the two of us. Itll be great.  MP3- Mother Ain't Dead /with Rod Stewart

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ROD STEWART'S TRIBUTE - Friday, July 29, 2005 - National Exhibition Centre Arena - Birmingham, England
Rod Stewart performed Friday July 29/05 in Birmingham England and paid tribute to Long John Baldry's memory singing 'I'll Be Seeing You'. Thank you Rod for this heartfelt tribute. View the tribute performance here.

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